Take Time to Create Your Own Path

For many people, the need to change careers may be imposed upon them. Company downsizing and positions becoming obsolete may result in job seekers feeling the pressure to retrain. Whether it is continuous education classes or more formal post-secondary diploma or degree programs, it is undeniable that lifelong learning is now a survival skill in today's competitive marketplace.

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Why do you want this job?

For many employers, the recruitment process is as much about risk management as it is about finding qualified applicants. Consider this: Workopolis reports that, “According to a recent study by the Conference Board of Canada, the average time needed to fill a role is 56 days, with the average cost to hire a new employee coming in at $6,227.” Put simply, this process is time-consuming and expensive. Employers, especially those with lots hiring experience, know that what they need most are passionate people who will stay long enough to return on the investment of energy and money that goes into the onboarding process.

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What is the new normal for job search?

For months we have talked about COVID…the potential impact on our health, months of social isolation from loved ones, restrictions on non-essential travel, and long-term unemployment. While many of us thought in March it would only last a few weeks, here we are 5 months later with still many restrictions in place. With long-term uncertainty and the various stages of businesses reopening, it has been challenging both supporting and advising job seekers on how to cope with the pandemic. Here are the things we know for sure:

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The Job That Got Away…

The job search process is incredibly competitive. With resume submissions, online applications, networking, social media management, and interviews, there are so many opportunities to highlight your value. And then it finally happens…you get a job interview and feel like you nailed it. The employer is talking like you already have the job, you sense rapport, and it appears that only the formalities remain before you land the position.

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How Labour Market Information Can Prepare Us for the Future

As Career Practitioners, we are often asked “Where are the jobs?” In the pre-digital world, that was a bit easier to predict, however recent statistics have indicated that, “By 2030, the majority of jobs that will be in demand do not even exist yet” (Ontario Centers of Excellence Advancing Education Program). That statement alone can be very distressing or motivating, depending on your life perspective. What does become clear is that our ability to embrace lifelong learning, be adaptable and multi-skilled will better position us for the careers of the future.
We know that the employment landscape continues to change with a decrease in long-term full-time positions to an increase in self-employment, contract and remote work. Rohit Talwar – Fast Future (2017) cites, “Canadians entering the work force today can expect to hold 40 different jobs in ten completely different career paths in their lives.” That is a long way from the full-time permanent jobs available in the generation before us. Given the fact that, “51 percent of people are staying at a job for less than two years” (Workopolis, 2017), the concept of choosing a forever career is not as feasible as it once was. The world is changing and, like it or not, we must keep up in order to remain competitive in today’s marketplace.

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"She Made Me Feel Like I\u2019m a Shining Star"

When Hayley Burnett came to EPC seeking assistance with her job search, she already had prior experience working with employment agencies. This had not always been a positive situation for her and, while often offered access to workshops, what Hayley knew she really needed was an advocate.

As a graduate of the Child and Youth Worker Program at Centennial College, she had been seeking long term employment in her field of study since 2014. Dealing with the challenges associated with having a physical disability, she felt she had been struggling with stereotypes including employer concerns regarding potential health costs, her level of independence, and productivity.

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